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Acounts Receivable:
Money owed by customers for received goods or services. Customers must have been billed for items to be included in receivables.

Accrued Expenses:
Expenses shown on the income statement but not yet paid.

Actual EPS, CPS, or DPS:
Reported annual Earnings Per Share (EPS -Trailing 12 months), cash flow (CPS) or Dividends Per Share (DPS) for a company for the fiscal year indicated. For companies which report on a quarterly basis, this information will contain the sum of the actual earnings, cash flow or dividends for the previous four quarters. For companies that report semi-annually, the field will contain the sum of the previous two semi-annual actuals.

After-Hours Trading:
Stock trading when the major stock exchanges are closed.

Aftermarket:
Public trading of a company's shares after its IPO.

After Hours Best Ask:
The price at which someone who owns a security offers to sell a NASDAQ security during the current day's After Hours market; also known as the asked price. Investors may trade in the After Hours Market (4:00-6:30 p.m. ET for NASDAQ stocks and 4:00-8:00 p.m. ET for NYSE and Amex stocks). Participation by Market Makers and ECNs is strictly voluntary and as a result, this session may offer less liquidity and inferior prices. Stock prices may also move more quickly in this environment. Investors who anticipate trading during these times are strongly advised to use limit orders. NASD Rule 3350 (the Short Sale Rule) will initially not apply during 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET.

After Hours Best Bid:
The price a prospective buyer is prepared to pay at a particular time for trading a NASDAQ security during the current day's After Hours market. Investors may trade in the After Hours Market (4:00-6:30 p.m. ET for NASDAQ stocks and 4:00-8:00 p.m. ET for NYSE and Amex stocks) on The NASDAQ Stock Market. Participation by Market Makers and ECNs is strictly voluntary and as a result, this session may offer less liquidity and inferior prices. Stock prices may also move more quickly in this environment. Investors who anticipate trading during these times are strongly advised to use limit orders.

After Hours High:
The after hours high represents the highest price a person purchased this security during the current day's After Hours trading session. Investors may trade in After Hours Market (4:00-6:30 p.m. ET for NASDAQ stocks and 4:00-8:00 p.m. ET for NYSE and Amex stocks). Participation by Market Makers and ECNs is strictly voluntary and as a result may offer less liquidity and inferior prices. Stock prices may also move more quickly in this environment. Investors who anticipate trading during these times are strongly advised to use limit orders.

After Hours Last Sale:
An electronic entry by an NASD Member firm representing the price involved in a transaction of a NASDAQ security during the current day's After Hours session. The trade report must be submitted to NASDAQ within 90 seconds after the execution of the trade. Investors may trade in the After Hours Market (4:00-6:30 p.m. ET for NASDAQ stocks and 4:00-8:00 p.m. ET for NYSE and Amex stocks). Participation by Market Makers and ECNs is strictly voluntary and as a result may offer less liquidity and inferior prices. Stock prices may also move more quickly in this environment. Investors who anticipate trading during these times are strongly advised to use limit orders.

After Hours Low :
The after hours low represents the lowest price a person purchased this security during the After Hours trading session. Investors may trade in the After Hours Market (4:00-6:30 p.m. ET for NASDAQ stocks and 4:00-8:00 p.m. ET for NYSE and Amex stocks). Participation by Market Makers and ECNs is strictly voluntary and as a result may offer less liquidity and inferior prices. Stock prices may also move more quickly in this environment. Investors who anticipate trading during these times are strongly advised to use limit orders.

After Hours Volume:
An electronic entry by an NASD Member firm representing the number of shares involved in a transaction of a NASDAQ security during the current day's After Hours session. The trade report must be submitted to NASDAQ within 90 seconds after the execution of the trade. Investors may trade in After Hours Market (4:00-6:30 p.m. ET for NASDAQ stocks and 4:00-8:00 p.m. ET for NYSE and Amex stocks). Participation by Market Makers and ECNs is strictly voluntary and as a result may offer less liquidity and inferior prices. Stock prices may also move more quickly in this environment. Investors who anticipate trading during these times are strongly advised to use limit orders.

Alpha:
Alpha measures the difference between a fund's actual returns and its expected returns given its risk level as measured by its beta. A positive alpha figure indicates the fund has performed better than its beta would predict. In contrast, a negative alpha indicates a fund has underperformed, given the expectations established by the fund's beta. Some investors see alpha as a measurement of the value added or subtracted by a fund's manager.

American Depositary Receipt (ADR):
A security, created by a U.S. bank, that evidences ownership to a specified number of shares of a foreign security held in a depositary in the issuing company's country of domicile. The certificate, transfer, and settlement practices for ADRs are identical to those for U.S. securities. U.S. investors often prefer ADRs to direct purchase of foreign shares because of the ready availability of price information, lower transaction costs, and timely dividend distribution.

American Stock Exchange (AMEX):
The second-oldest U.S. stock exchange, located on Wall Street in New York City. Started as an alternative to the NYSE, the AMEX originating on the curb outside the NYSE, where brokers traded stocks that failed to meet the Big Board's listing requirements. Considerably smaller in market capitalization and trading volume than NASDAQ and the NYSE, the AMEX conducts trading through a centralized specialist system and is home primarily to small and medium-sized companies.

AMEX Composite - XAX:
The AMEX Composite Index - (XAX) the American Stock Exchange introduced a new AMEX Composite Index with a new ticker symbol, XAX, on January 2, 1997. The XAX is a market capitalization-weighted, price appreciation index, and replaces the AMEX Market Value Index (XAM) which, since its inception, has been calculated on a "total return basis" to include the reinvestment of dividends paid by AMEX companies. The new AMEX Composite Index is more comparable with other major indexes, which reflect only the price appreciation of their respective components.

Announcement Date:
The date on which the company first made news of the split public.

Annualized Dividend:
This field is a calculated value and uses the last dividend paid multiplied by the frequency. It is the amount of a dividend paid to shareholders over four quarters. A quarterly dividend is therefore multiplied by four to determine its annualized value. A monthly dividend is multiplied by twelve. A one-time dividend is considered fully-annualized at its base value. One-time dividends are not multiplied.

Amortization:
When a company makes an acquisition, the excess paid over the acquired firm's book value is termed goodwill. Until recently, the acquiring company was required to amortize the goodwill over a specified period. That requirement was changed in 2002, and firms are no longer required to amortize goodwill.

Analyst:
Someone typically working for a brokerage house, who publishes buy/hold/sell recommendations and earnings forecasts for a stock. Buy side analysts work for institutional buyers, and sell side analysts work for brokerages.

Annuity:
A contract sold by life insurance companies that guarantees a specified payment at some future time, usually retirement.

Arbitrage:
The act of taking advantage of the difference in price of the same security traded on two different markets...

Ask Price (or "offer" price):
The price at which a Market Maker is willing to sell a security.

AT Market:
Share of future Buy or Sell order which let the broker doing the operation the freedom to fix the rate of change for the trade as the trader has not previously fixed a limit Price for the operation.

Assets:
Any possessions that have value on an exchange. Assets include tangible items such as inventories, equipment, or real estate, as well as intangible items such as property rights or goodwill.

Average Daily Volume:
Average number of shares traded per day over a specified period.

Average maturity:
A weighted average of all the maturities of the bonds in a portfolio, computed by weighing each maturity date (the date the security comes due) by the market value of the security.

Average duration:
An estimate of how much a bond fund's share price will fluctuate in response to a change in interest rates. To see how the price could shift, multiply the fund's duration by the change in rates. If interest rates rise by one percentage point, the share price of a fund with an average duration of five years would decline by about 5%. If rates decrease by a percentage point, the fund's share price would rise by 5%.

Average weighted coupon:
The average interest rate paid on the bonds held by a fund. It is expressed as a percentage of the stated maturity value of its bonds.

Average P/E Ratio:
Average price/earnings ratio of stocks owned by a mutual fund.


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